Back to Index

AASHE Bulletin Logo

Table of Contents for 4/12/07:

NEWS
1. St. John's College Purchases 100% Wind Power
2. U Guelph Students Approve Fee for Energy Conservation; Admin. to Match
3. James Madison U Students Approve Green Fee
4. U Tennessee Chattanooga Students Approve Sustainability Fee
5. U Memphis Students Approve Sustainability Fee Increase
6. 28 More Campuses Sign Climate Neutral Commitment
7. UMASS Amherst Cut Water Consumption 38% Over Three Years
8. U Hawaii Manoa Partners with Utility on Energy Goals
9. Universal Access Transit Program Coming to U Cincinnati
10. UW River Falls Launches Institute for Sustainability Challenges
11. CU Boulder Law Building Receives LEED Gold Certification
12. Harvard Wins National Recycling Award
13. College of the Atlantic Breaks Ground for Green Dorms
14. U Guelph Students Vote Against Coke, for Fair Trade Coffee
15. University of Toronto to Sell-Off Tobacco Industry Holdings
16. Southern Methodist U in Taos Purchases Renewable Energy
17. Green Roof Completed at University of Florida
18. U Delaware Unveils Hydrogen-Powered Bus
19. Iowa State Announces $22.5 Million Biofuel Research Program

NEW RESOURCES
20. Creating a Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund: A Guide for Students

OPPORTUNITIES
21. People, Ecology and Development Study Abroad Program-Thailand

JOBS & INTERNSHIPS
22. Coordinator, High Performance Building Resources, Harvard University
23. Coordinator, Green Campus Building Services, Harvard University
24. Sustainability Coordinator, George Mason University

EVENTS
25. AASHE Sustainability Across the Curriculum Leadership Workshop
26. Transportation Demand Management Toolkit

News

 

1. St. John's College Purchases 100% Wind Power
St. John's College has purchased enough renewable energy credits to offset all of the electricity used in 2007, and have committed to buying more. The move comes after more than 50 percent of students signed a petition supporting the purchase of renewable energy.

2. U Guelph Students Approve Fee for Energy Conservation; Admin. to Match
Undergraduate students at the University of Guelph recently approved a $10 per semester fee increase for the next 12 years to go toward energy conservation measures on campus. The University will match the money raised by the fee increase. Faculty and staff are also being invited to contribute to the energy conservation fund, with their contributions also to be matched by the University. All money raised in these programs will go into a special account that will be monitored by the Senate Committee on University Planning, which has representation from faculty, staff and students.

3. James Madison U Students Approve Green Fee
81 percent of students at James Madison University voted in favor of a Green Fee of $9 per semester to fund energy efficiency and conservation initiatives on campus, as well as the direct purchase of renewable energy. The funds would go into a Green Fund, which would be managed by a committee of students, faculty and administrators. The proposal now goes to the James Madison Board of Visitors for approval.

4. U Tennessee Chattanooga Students Approve Sustainability Fee
72 percent of voting students in a recent student government election at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga supported of a fee increase of up to 10 per semester to fund energy efficiency and use of renewable energy. Before it goes into effect, the proposed increase must be included in the University's budget recommendations and then approved by the UT Board of Trustees.

5. U Memphis Students Approve Sustainability Fee Increase
69 percent of voting students at University of Memphis recently voted in favor of a fee increase of unspecified amount to purchase renewable energy and to fund efficiency and sustainability projects on campus. The Student Government Association will ultimately decide exactly how much of a fee increase to recommend. To help inform the SGA's decision, the Environmental Action Club has collected signatures from almost 2500 students on a petition supporting a $20 per semester fee increase.
See also: Environmental Action Club homepage

6. 28 More Campuses Sign Climate Neutral Commitment
28 new campuses have signed or committed to sign the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment since the last update in AASHE Bulletin. In doing so, these campuses have committed to develop comprehensive plans for achieving climate neutrality. The new signatories are: Robert N. Shelton of University of Arizona, Dave Frohnmayer of University of Oregon, Shirley C. Raines of University of Memphis, John A. Fry of Franklin & Marshall College, Linda Bunnell of University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, Martha J. Kanter of Foothill-De Anza Community College District, James E. Brenneman of Goshen College, Helen F. Giles-Gee of Keene State College, Sara Jayne Steen of Plymouth State University, Margaret A. McKenna of Lesley University, Daniel S. Papp of Kennesaw State University, Miguel Angel Corzo of University of the Arts, Stephen M. Jordan of Metropolitan State College of Denver; Tori Haring-Smith of Washington and Jefferson College, Esther L. Barazzone of Chatham College, Thomas H. Powell of Mount St. Mary's University, Viji George of Concordia College-New York, Brad Bartel of Fort Lewis College, Martha M. Ellis of Lee College, Jennifer L. Braaten of Ferrum College, Lorna D. Edmundson of Wilson College, Jackie Jenkins-Scott of Wheelock College, William A. Shields of University of Pittsburgh - Titusville, John W. Mills of Paul Smith's College of Arts and Sciences, James W. Hottois of Palo Verde College, Mary K. Grant of Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Charles Wall of Massasoit Community College, and L. Michael Metke of Lake Washington Technical College. 173 college and university presidents and chancellors have now signed the Commitment.

7. UMASS Amherst Cut Water Consumption 38% Over Three Years
The University of Massachusetts Amherst has managed to reduce water consumption by 38 percent since 2004, when the University signed a 10-year, $42.7 million contract for energy and water conservation projects. The contractor fixed leaks, installed new water-saving toilets, sinks and showers, and put in new meters or repaired old ones. In addition, the campus began using wastewater from Amherst's treatment plant instead of drinking water to produce steam in its power plant. As a result, the University's annual water costs have decreased by $400,000, despite rising rates.

8. U Hawaii Manoa Partners with Utility on Energy Goals
The University of Hawaii at Manoa and Hawaiian Electric Company recently formalized a partnership to work together to save energy and reduce the University's greenhouse gas emissions. The partnership is designed to achieve a 30 percent reduction of campus-wide energy use by 2012 and a 50 percent reduction of by 2015, based on a 2003 benchmark. The University has set an additional goal of receiving 25 percent of campus-wide energy use from renewable sources by 2020. By 2050, the Manoa campus intends to achieve self-sufficiency in energy and water, and plans to treat and transform its wastes into useable resources. "We are initiating a new partnership with HECO to work together to put the UH Manoa campus on the path to energy sustainability, to reduce the impact on global warming, and to return savings to pressing academic needs," said Chancellor Denise Eby Konan.

9. Universal Access Transit Program Coming to U Cincinnati (link no longer available)
University of Cincinnati is partnering with Cincinnati Metro to offer fare-free transit passes to all students, faculty, and staff. The 3-year deal will cost the University $150,000 for the first and second year, and then $187,500 in the third year. Student fees will be used to cover half of these costs. The number of bus riders from UC tripled during a trial of the fare-free program nearly two years ago.
See also:
Student newspaper article

10. UW River Falls Launches Institute for Sustainability Challenges
The St. Croix Institute for Sustainable Community Development has been created at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. The Institute will help local communities address sustainability challenges related to the region's growth. The institute also will coordinate the efforts across campus as it implements a major institutional initiative to become a climate neutral, energy independent campus. UWRF environmental sciences Professor Kelly Cain was appointed to serve as the director of the institute.

11. CU Boulder Law Building Receives LEED Gold Certification
The U.S. Green Building Council has awarded LEED Gold certification to the Wolf Law Building at the University of Colorado at Boulder. The recently completed 180,000-square-foot, $46 million building features high-efficiency lighting, CO2 monitoring, low-flow water fixtures, waterless urinals, a high-efficiency cooling system and central steam heat. During construction, 91 percent of the materials from demolition and construction were recycled. The law school also is powered by 100 percent renewable energy through wind energy credits. "We are committed to making the LEED Gold certification a consistent goal for our future buildings, just as we have made sustainability a guiding value in all that we do at the University of Colorado at Boulder," said Chancellor G.P. "Bud" Peterson.

12. Harvard Wins National Recycling Award
The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) selected Harvard University as the winner of the 2007 AF&PA Recycling Award in the college and university category. The awards were created to recognize outstanding paper recycling efforts. Harvard operates what is believed to be the largest urban campus recycling program in the northeastern United States, diverting 2,600 tons of paper from July 2005 to June 2006. Harvard's recycling program has also saved the Faculty of Arts and Sciences more than $120,000 in the past five years and the Harvard Dining Services more than $200,000 in the past eight years. These savings, in turn, fund recycling efforts such as the Resource Efficiency and Graduate Green Living programs. Last year, Harvard achieved an overall recycling rate of 44 percent.
See also: Harvard Gazette article, Harvard Crimson article

13. College of the Atlantic Breaks Ground for Green Dorms
College of the Atlantic is breaking ground for the Katherine W. Davis Student Residence Village, a 51-bed green residence complex. Sustainability features of the residence complex include in-floor radiant heating, super-insulated design, and wood pellet heating. In addition, wastewater from showers will be used to preheat water going into the hot water system, and an energy recovery central ventilation unit will preheat fresh air coming into the building during the heating season.
See also: Listing of Green Residence Halls" track="true"> (AASHE members only)

14. U Guelph Students Vote Against Coke, for Fair Trade Coffee
In a recent student election at University of Guelph, 64 percent of voting students supported replacing of Coca-Cola with an alternate beverage supplier and 66 percent of voting students supported selling only fair trade coffee on campus. The vote against Coke was motivated by concerns about alleged human rights abuses in Colombia and environmental devastation in India. The fair trade measure indicated that students would be willing to pay $0.01 to $0.11 more per cup of coffee to pay for the switch to all fair trade coffee.

15. University of Toronto to Sell-Off Tobacco Industry Holdings
University of Toronto has announced its intent to be the first institution of higher education in Canada to divest from the tobacco industry. The University is also prohibiting future investments in the tobacco industry. The move comes after more than a year of advocacy by students concerned about the health effects of tobacco use. As of December 31, 2005, U of T held approximately $10.5-million of tobacco industry stock.

16. Southern Methodist U in Taos Purchases Renewable Energy
SMU-in-Taos, a satellite campus of Southern Methodist University has purchased 9,500 kWh of wind energy from the Kit Carson Electric Cooperative. The campus also recently developed a new master plan for which includes plans to use LEED standards when designing new buildings and to add solar panels onto several buildings.

17. Green Roof Completed at University of Florida
The University of Florida recently completed the installation of a 2,600-square-foot green roof. The roof, which covers an amphitheater next to UF's School of Building Construction, includes a dozen species of native plants and is intended be a model for future building projects on the campus. The roof will be studied for to determine its benefit in reducing and cleaning stormwater runoff. All runoff that isn't absorbed by the roof will be stored in cisterns and used to irrigate the roof during dry periods.

18. U Delaware Unveils Hydrogen-Powered Bus
The University of Delaware will soon be operating a shuttle bus powered by hydrogen fuel cells. The project also includes development of a hydrogen refueling station to be used by the bus and, eventually, by other hydrogen-powered vehicles. The project, which was initiated by researchers from the College of Engineering, is intended to be a multidisciplinary demonstration and education project. The hydrogen fuel cell bus project is supported by a $1.7 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration, matched by private financing from companies working in partnership with the University.

19. Iowa State Announces $22.5 Million Biofuel Research Program
ConocoPhillips has announced plans to establish an eight-year, $22.5 million research program at Iowa State University dedicated to developing technologies that produce biorenewable fuels. ConocoPhillips will make an initial $1.5 million grant in 2007 to support Iowa State researchers, with additional grants of $3 million per year for seven years. The research will focus on biofuel-production technology, crop production, the harvesting and transportation of biomass, and the impacts of biofuels on economic policy and rural sociology.

New Resources

 

20. Creating a Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund: A Guide for Students
AASHE has published a new how-to manual, entitled Creating a Campus Sustainability Revolving Loan Fund: A Guide for Students, that provides step-by-step directions for establishing a campus sustainability revolving loan fund. The guide, which is written by two sophomores at Macalester College, is based on the experiences of the authors in setting up a revolving loan fund at Macalester College. The guide provides several examples of how institutions have used revolving loan funds to fund sustainability projects.

Opportunities

 

21. People, Ecology and Development Study Abroad Program-Thailand
The International Sustainable Development Studies Institute is now accepting applications for its Spring 2008 People, Ecology and Development study abroad program in Thailand. The program focuses on the links between culture, ecology and sustainability through the experiential study of specific communities and ecosystems. ISDSI Expedition Field Courses are upper division courses which require living cross-culturally and traveling in remote areas--villages, islands, rivers and mountains; while traveling by foot, sea kayak or canoe. Students earn a semester of academic credit while on the program. The Spring semester includes the intensive study of Thai, as well as studies of rivers, human rights and the environment; islands, reefs and mangrove ecosystems; and ethnic peoples and forests. The deadline for applications is October 12, 2007.

Jobs & Internships

 

22. Coordinator, High Performance Building Resources, Harvard University
Harvard Green Campus Initiative (HGCI) is hiring for a position with the responsibility to continue the ongoing development, and coordinate future development, of the Harvard High Performance Building Resource. This Resource is designed to be both a clearing house and a living resource for all of Harvard's green building projects going forward. The position that will have day to day responsibility of supporting a team of HGCI staff to make this Resource as effective as it can be, and will involve expanding the resource to support efforts in laboratory building construction and renovation along with Building Maintenance and Operations for existing buildings. Applicants should hold a related undergraduate and/or graduate degree and have strong knowledge of LEED.

23. Coordinator, Green Campus Building Services, Harvard University
Harvard Green Campus Initiative (HGCI) is hiring a Coordinator of Green Campus Building Services to coordinate energy management strategies, implement energy conservation measures and project manage a range of campus sustainability projects for a wide variety of departments and faculties across Harvard University. Particular focus will be placed on project management, in which the coordinator will prioritize, cost out and implement a myriad of energy conservation projects while working directly with contractors. Applicants must have a related undergraduate and/or graduate degree and a strong understanding of building systems in relation to utility conservation.

24. Sustainability Coordinator, George Mason University
Facilities Administration at George Mason University has an immediate opening for a University Sustainability Coordinator. This position will be responsible for developing and leading a coherent, university-wide sustainability program, coordinating operations, academic, research and student sustainability activities, as well as assessing cost effectiveness, technical feasibility, and means of achieving acceptance. This position will lead development of a university sustainability strategic plan, creating short and long-term initiatives. Incumbent will also work with appropriate university units and departments to implement initiatives. Applicants must have experience in strategic planning, program management, team management, partnership building, and idea marketing. Salary is commensurate with training and experience.

Events

 

25. AASHE Sustainability Across the Curriculum Leadership Workshop
July 12-13, 2007; San Diego State University
AASHE's Sustainability Across the Curriculum Leadership workshops are for faculty leaders of all disciplines who wish to develop curriculum change programs around sustainability on their campuses. Through an intensive two days of presentations, exercises, discussions, reflection, and planning, participants will become familiar with the philosophy of change in higher education developed through the Ponderosa Project at Northern Arizona University and adapted at Emory in the Piedmont Project. Participants will also experience of range of workshop strategies, hear local experts, enjoy outdoor place-based activities, and dialogue with faculty from around the country as they gain help in adapting this model to their own campus. The workshop leaders, Peggy Barlett and Geoffrey Chase, are editors of Sustainability on Campus: Stories and Strategies for Change and have helped more than 200 faculty revise courses in a wide array of disciplines. Workshop tuition is $350 for AASHE members and $390 for non-members. Applications to participate are due by May 18, 2007.

26. Transportation Demand Management Toolkit
July 16-18, 2007; Boston, MA
This conference will help participants learn best practices for planning and promoting transportation demand management programs. Participants will develop a toolkit for managing traffic demand on their campuses through effective implementation of transportation demand management techniques. Instructors include: Will Toor and Spenser Havlick, coauthors of Transportation for Sustainable Campus Communities; as well the Director of Sustainable Transportation Systems at Yale and the Director of Transportation and Parking Services at University of Chicago.

AASHE Bulletin is a weekly service of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. Production of AASHE Bulletin is made possible with funding from our members. If you enjoy AASHE Bulletin and are not currently a member of AASHE, please encourage your school or organization to join. Membership dues support AASHE's core activities and enable us to provide vital benefits and services like AASHE Bulletin. Learn more about AASHE membership


Creative Commons License Information

The content of AASHE Bulletin is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 License. You may redistribute, copy, or otherwise reuse the AASHE Bulletin provided that you do so for non-commercial purposes and credit AASHE.


You are receiving this email because you subscribed on the AASHE website or otherwise indicated your interest in receiving AASHE Bulletin. To ensure future delivery of AASHE Bulletin to your inbox, please add bulletin@aashe.org to your address book.