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Table of Contents for 5/10/07:

NEWS
1. Middlebury College Commits to Carbon Neutrality by 2016
2. Stanford Creates Department of Sustainability and Energy Management
3. Arizona State Appoints VP for Research as Chief Sustainability Officer
4. U Colorado Student Union Creates Energy and Climate Revolving Fund
5. Pacific Lutheran Launches Pilot Composting Program
6. 13 Presidents Call for Cooperation to Solve Environmental Challenges
7. Pacific Lutheran Student Government Approves Green Energy Fee
8. U Maine at Presque Isle Announces Plans for a Campus Wind Turbine
9. 18 New Campuses Sign Presidents Climate Commitment
10. Duke Adopts Wage, Health Care Standards for Food Service Contractors
11. U New Mexico Announces Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts
12. Brock U Announces Energy and Water Conservation Initiatives
13. Oberlin to Hold Environmentally Friendly Commencement
14. Rice Tests Permeable Sidewalk
15. Furman "Gets Trashed"
16. UC Irvine Opens Green Demonstration Dorm Room
17. Smith College Announces Sudan Divestment
18. U.Va. Dining and Housing Departments Earn Environmental Recognition

NEW RESOURCES
19. Cornell University Green Report
20. New University of Maryland Sustainability Website

OPPORTUNITIES
21. Peer-to-Peer Sustainability Outreach Program Survey
22. MTV True Life Opportunity: I'm Stopping Global Warming
23. Food Project's 2007-08 BLAST Leadership Cadre
24. Energy Management Certificate Program
25. Opportunity to be Featured in Green Building Study

JOBS & INTERNSHIPS
26. Faculty Position in Sustainable Design and Development, Yale University
27. Director of Environmental Studies, U Prince Edward Island

EVENTS
28. AASHE Sustainability Across the Curriculum Leadership Workshop
29. Campus Transportation Demand Management Toolkit

News

 

1. Middlebury College Commits to Carbon Neutrality by 2016
The Middlebury College Board of Trustees has approved a plan to become a carbon neutral institution by 2016. The college plans to achieve carbon neutrality through a combination of efforts, including the 2008 completion of a biomass plant, which will be powered by wood chips; operational adjustments such as energy efficient lighting and facility upgrades; and - after all other economically feasible efforts to reduce carbon have been exhausted - the purchase of carbon offsets. MiddShift, a student organization, originally presented its carbon neutrality initiative to the board of trustees in February 2007. That meeting led to the formation of the Carbon Neutrality Advisory Group (CNAG), which includes both students and administrators, to further develop a final written proposal outlining the potential costs, risks and organizational impact of achieving carbon neutrality over the next nine years.
See also: Listing of Campus Global Warming Commitments

2. Stanford Creates Department of Sustainability and Energy Management
In a move to synthesize sustainable campus operations from the top down, Stanford's Department of Land, Buildings and Real Estate has announced the creation of a campus sustainability executive director position along with a radical restructuring of Facilities Operations. The position, which is yet to be filled, will be Stanford's first dedicated to overseeing the university's sustainability programs. The change will split Facilities Operations-the department that manages everything from energy and water conservation to transportation to landscaping-into two groups. The new executive director will lead the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management (SEM) in overseeing the Utilities Division, which governs energy and water use; Parking and Transportation Services, which runs the transportation demand management programs; and Cardinal Cogen, the campus power plant. A second new position, the sustainability programs manager, will be created in the SEM department to help promote outreach activities with the Stanford community. The Department of Buildings and Grounds Maintenance (BGM), the second group, will be headed by the current associate vice provost for facilities and will manage landscaping and building maintenance.

3. Arizona State Appoints VP for Research as Chief Sustainability Officer
Arizona State University has named Jonathan Fink as the Julie A. Wrigley director of the Global Institute of Sustainability (GIOS), and the chief sustainability officer, a newly created position within the Office of the President. Fink, ASU's vice president for research and economic affairs for the past 10 years, will split his faculty appointment between the School of Sustainability and the School of Earth and Space Exploration. Fink will oversee and coordinate four components of ASU's sustainability efforts - the research of GIOS, the educational programs of the School of Sustainability, the integration of the wider set of sustainability activities across all of ASU, and sustainable campus operations. Both appointments are effective July 1.

4. U Colorado Student Union Creates Energy and Climate Revolving Fund
The University of Colorado Student Union (UCSU) recently voted unanimously to approve the Energy and Climate Revolving Fund (ECRF). The $500,000 fund will support student government's carbon neutrality goal for student-managed buildings by enabling the managers of UCSU buildings to pay for energy efficiency and other measures that reduce greenhouse gas emissions while saving money. UCSU building managers will use the ECRF as a source of low-interest loans to pay for greenhouse gas reduction projects that will ultimately save students' money in reduced energy costs over time. These savings will then be used to pay back the individual loans, allowing the fund to remain whole and support ongoing and future efficiency projects. The $500,000 was allocated from the Special Operating Reserve, the student government's rainy day fund.
See also: Listing of Campus Sustainability Revolving Loan Funds (AASHE members only)

5. Pacific Lutheran Launches Pilot Composting Program
In an effort to decrease the amount of waste Pacific Lutheran University sends to the landfill each day, Dining Services is participating in a pilot industrial composting program. The service will compost all the paper and food waste produced daily by Dining Services. The kitchen and dish room are now stocked with 95-gallon bins to store compostable materials. Those materials include food and paper waste, and the bins are picked up six days a week. PLU already composts coffee grounds and yard waste clippings, but this is the first large scale-composting program that it has implemented.

6. 13 Presidents Call for Cooperation to Solve Environmental Challenges
Proclaiming that "energy and environmental issues represent the greatest challenges of this century," Washington University Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton joined presidents of 12 other research universities in calling for universities worldwide to marshal their resources for a global effort to secure a brighter, sustainable future. The Presidents issued a statement detailing plans for collaborative programs involving education, research, university operations, social sciences and policy studies. The statement was issued as part of a conference on energy and environmental issues taking place at WUSTL.

7. Pacific Lutheran Student Government Approves Green Energy Fee (link no longer available)
The Associated Students of Pacific Lutheran University recently approved a resolution in support of a $10 per semester fee increase to enable the college to purchase 100% of its electricity consumption from renewable sources as well as fund energy conservation on campus. The resolution was spearheaded by Grass Roots Environmental Action Now (GREAN), PLU's student environmental organization. GREAN collected over 1,100 student signatures in support of the resolution. The proposal now goes to the Board of Regents, who will vote on the matter in October.
See also:
Listing of Mandatory Student Fees for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

8. U Maine at Presque Isle Announces Plans for a Campus Wind Turbine
University of Maine at Presque Isle has announced plans to complete a $1.5 million campus wind turbine project in the next 18 months. The project is expected to involve the installation of one 500 kilowatt turbine on university property, producing enough electricity to provide more than a quarter of campus electricity needs. Officials expect savings of at least $100,000 a year. The University is seeking federal and state funding resources, but has the option to borrow the projected $1.5 million so the project can proceed in a timely manner.
See also: Listing of Campus Wind Turbine Installations

9. 18 New Campuses Sign Presidents Climate Commitment
18 new institutions have signed the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment since the last update in AASHE Bulletin. In doing so, these campuses have committed to develop comprehensive plans for achieving climate neutrality. The new signatories are: Andrew A. Sorensen of University of South Carolina (8 institutions), Milton D. Glick of University of Nevada, Reno, Nancy L. Zimpher of University of Cincinnati, Robert A. Corrigan of San Francisco State University, Nancy J. Vickers of Bryn Mawr College, Donald R. Eastman III of Eckerd College, Baird Tipson of Washington College, Robert A. Scott of Adelphi University, Debbie L. Sydow of Onondaga Community College, Jacqueline Liebergott of Emerson College, and Sharon L. Hirsh of Rosemont College. 239 college and university presidents and chancellors have now signed the Commitment.

10. Duke Adopts Wage, Health Care Standards for Food Service Contractors
Duke University has announced that it will require contracted food service vendors to offer full-time employees at least $10 per hour and basic health care coverage similar to what Duke offers its own employees. Duke officials will implement the policy as food service contracts are signed or renewed. In 2005, Duke increased the pay for all university employees to at least $10 per hour.

11. U New Mexico Announces Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts
University of New Mexico has announced that between 2000 and 2006, it reduced nitrous oxide emissions from 108 tons to 15 tons, or 86 percent, and reduced carbon dioxide emissions from 120,801 tons to 102,550 tons, or 15 percent. Many of the reductions were accomplished by replacing the old and inefficient boilers and chillers at the Ford Utility Center. UNM has also reduced water use by 28 percent between 1995 and 2006.

12. Brock U Announces Energy and Water Conservation Initiatives
Brock University has announced a series of wide-ranging energy and water conservation initiatives that are intended to lower the University's greenhouse gas emissions while allowing it to redirect the financial savings to academic and non-academic programs. The initiatives support planning and design guidelines for future savings as well as measures intended to achieve immediate results. The Board of Trustees recently approved the University's "Guide to the Planning, Design, and Architecture of the Natural and Built Environments" that endorses and promotes the use of green-building technology. Immediate measures include adjusting thermostats, turning off lights in offices, classrooms, and laboratories, and turning off powered devices and equipment, such as computers, printers, monitors, and copiers, when not required to be in use. Water conservation measures will see certain grassed areas of the University's Main Campus receiving less water through the irrigation system. Overall savings from this and other initiatives will enable the purchase and installation of replacement fixtures and devices such as water-efficient toilets with the goal of achieving a 54 percent water savings.

13. Oberlin to Hold Environmentally Friendly Commencement
Oberlin College has announced plans to hold a "green commencement" this year. In an effort to reduce the amount of waste generated by commencement related events, Campus Dining Services will replace all plasticware with bio-ware. In addition, 20 to 35 percent of the food provided by Dining Services will be purchased from local farmers and producers. Throughout commencement weekend, guests will be encouraged to visit a Green Education booth set up by the Oberlin Office of Sustainability, where they can purchase an offset for the carbon emissions used to travel to and from Oberlin. Graduating students who attend the annual Senior Dinner will be asked to sign a pledge to adopt a model of sustainability in their lifestyles and careers. Signers will receive green ribbons to wear during the commencement ceremony.

14. Rice Tests Permeable Sidewalk
Rice University is testing pervious concrete on a small section of sidewalk. The product allows water to drain through rather than run off the surface, thereby allowing water to percolate back into the soil or be detained rather than being channeled directly into storm drains. The permeable sidewalk is expected to save money by reducing or eliminating the need for water retention areas to contain run-off, which can be quite expensive in space-limited areas like a city or campus. If the test area performs well, Rice will begin using the pervious concrete for building new walkways and parking areas as well as repairing old ones.

15. UC Irvine Opens Green Demonstration Dorm Room
UC Irvine has opened "The Green Room," a demonstration dorm room furnished solely with products that are environmentally friendly. The room, which is in a freshmen housing complex, was designed to encourage students to consider using sustainable products in their own rooms. The Green Room will be available for viewing through the summer.

16. Furman 'Gets Trashed'
Furman University recently held its second annual "Furman Gets Trashed" Day. Trash from the university's residence halls was collected and sorted in the center of campus by a group of student volunteers. The students went through the trash and pulled out the materials that could be recycled. The sorted trash and recyclables were then put on display for students to see. Approximately 40 percent of the material turned out to recyclable. "The idea was to provide a striking visual of the waste stream on campus and promote waste reduction and recycling," said James Wilkins, Furman's environmental intern.

17. Smith College Announces Sudan Divestment
Carrying out its previous commitment to ban investment in companies with operations that support the government of Sudan, Smith College has announced that it will divest from one direct holding in its endowment and prohibit investment in an additional 26 firms. Smith will divest its holdings - valued at approximately $1.18 million - from the French energy company Schlumberger Ltd., whose Sudan operations provide oil and gas field services to the country's oil consortia. The banned companies were identified through a yearlong study led by the board's Committee on Investor Responsibility

18. U Virginia Dining and Housing Departments Earn Environmental Recognition
The University of Virginia's Dining Services and Housing Division were recently accepted into the Virginia Environmental Excellence Program. The departments were recognized for their environmentally friendly endeavors, including recycling efforts and a new "Eat Local" initiative to encourage buying more food locally. Dining services has implemented efforts to measure and reduce food waste and also has a program to recycle used cooking oil. Additionally, the department recently installed high-efficiency dishwashers and a pulper, which uses less water than an industrial garbage disposal and removes food waste solids from the sewer system. The Housing Division has installed low-flow washers and shower heads; minimized fertilizer usage on lawns; replaced regular carpeting with recyclable carpet squares; increased participation in the "Chuck It For Charity" program, which collects unwanted furniture and household items that would otherwise be trashed during move-outs; among other things.

New Resources

 

19. Cornell University Green Report
Cornell University has released its first Green Report, which outlines Cornell's impact on the environment and its efforts to reduce that impact. It is Cornell's first attempt at compiling a comprehensive assessment of the campus' environmental footprint and it is expected to be updated regularly. Among the topics covered in the report are: land use, energy, buildings, materials, transportation and waste.

20. New University of Maryland Sustainability Website
The University of Maryland recently launched a new website detailing environmental stewardship efforts on campus. The website describes the University's sustainability initiatives in operations, academics, and research, and also describes opportunities for students to get involved. The site also includes links to a variety of resources.
See also: Listing of Campus Sustainability Websites

Opportunities

 

21. Peer-to-Peer Sustainability Outreach Program Survey
Christina Erickson, University of Vermont's Eco-Reps Program Coordinator, is surveying Peer-to-Peer Sustainability Outreach Programs as part of her doctoral research in sustainability education. She is seeking basic demographic information about participating campuses and program coordinators; logistical information on the programs including mission, funding, and activities; and ideas on best practices and overcoming challenges that such programs face. The survey will be open through Friday, June 1st, 2007. For more information, contact Christina Erickson at christina.erickson@uvm.edu.

22. MTV True Life Opportunity: I'm Stopping Global Warming
MTV is filming an episode of their documentary series, True Life, on activists fighting to stop global warming. They are asking global warming activists between the ages of 17 and 28 to submit their stories.

23. Food Project's 2007-08 BLAST Leadership Cadre
The BLAST (Building Local Agricultural Systems Today) Leadership Cadre is a one-year professional development program for 18-25 year olds working to build just and sustainable food systems by growing food, working with youth, promoting local and fair food, or advocating for and crafting policy. Cadre members continue to work in their own communities and campuses, and have opportunities to work together on policy and activism. The Cadre provides training in advocacy, communication and leadership, opportunities for public speaking, networking, and exploration of the food system, and guaranteed access to national conferences. Applications are due by Friday, May 25, 2007.

24. Energy Management Certificate Program
July 9-20; University of Oregon, Eugene, OR
The Energy Management Certificate Program is an advanced certification program that requires the student to implement an energy-saving project and measure the results. This program goes beyond the fundamentals and teaches a broad spectrum of energy management principles and techniques. Topics include building energy use, glazing, insulation, building envelope, heating/cooling, secondary HVAC, controls, central plant equipment, energy auditing, operation and maintenance. Each topic is covered by a discipline expert. Participation in the program costs $4,500, which includes the course and all course materials, room and board, follow up assistance during the project implementation phase of the program, and an equipment lending program.

25. Opportunity to be Featured in Green Building Study
Capital E/ Good Energies and national partners, including the US Green Building Council, American Public Health Association and the Federation of American Scientists, have launched a major new national study on the costs and benefits of green buildings, entitled Greening America's Buildings and Communities: Cost and Benefits. Capital E is currently seeking buildings to include in this study. If you have been involved with a campus green building project and have/can get and share specific data on the project cost, 'green premium' and energy and water performance compared to a conventional building - your building may be eligible to be included in this landmark study. Inclusion in this report will provide national publicity for your campus green building project and free analysis on the financial impacts of that building on your campus and community. To have your green building project included in this study, please contact Jon Braman, Research Associate and Assistant to Greg Kats, Capital E, jbraman@cap-e.com, (202) 463-1550.

Jobs & Internships

 

26. Faculty Position in Sustainable Design and Development, Yale University
Yale University's School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and School of Architecture seek applicants for a joint ladder level Assistant Professorship in Sustainable Design and Development, with an emphasis on the urban environment. Applicants should have expertise in the management and design of urban environmental systems and urban ecological infrastructures with a focus on the neighborhood and community scale rather than the building and site scale. The successful candidate will be expected to advise, supervise and instruct both environmental studies and architecture students, offering lecture, seminar and/ or project-based courses. This person will be expected to assume a leadership role in the recently established School of Forestry & Environmental Studies and School of Architecture joint Master's Degree program. The deadline for applications is July 15, 2007.

27. Director of Environmental Studies, U Prince Edward Island
The University of Prince Edward Island is seeking a unique academic to lead and coordinate its efforts to become a leader in the teaching, research and practice of environmental sustainability. The position of Director of Environmental Studies at UPEI is a full-time tenure track position at the Assistant Professor level, beginning January or July 2008. The successful candidate will help build on the success of this program, and in addition, help the university move further along adopting and developing a culture grounded in sustainability values and practices. Applicants should have a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies or a comparable or related field. Candidates are encouraged to apply by September 1, 2007.

Events

 

28. AASHE Sustainability Across the Curriculum Leadership Workshop
July 12-13, 2007; San Diego State University
AASHE's Sustainability Across the Curriculum Leadership workshops are for faculty leaders of all disciplines who wish to develop curriculum change programs around sustainability on their campuses. Through an intensive two days of presentations, exercises, discussions, reflection, and planning, participants will become familiar with the philosophy of change in higher education developed through the Ponderosa Project at Northern Arizona University and adapted at Emory in the Piedmont Project. Participants will also experience of range of workshop strategies, hear local experts, enjoy outdoor place-based activities, and dialogue with faculty from around the country as they gain help in adapting this model to their own campus. The workshop leaders, Peggy Barlett and Geoffrey Chase, are editors of Sustainability on Campus: Stories and Strategies for Change and have helped more than 200 faculty revise courses in a wide array of disciplines. Workshop tuition is $350 for AASHE members and $390 for non-members. Applications to participate are due by May 18, 2007.

29. Campus Transportation Demand Management Toolkit
July 16-18, 2007; Boston, MA
This conference will help participants learn best practices for planning and promoting transportation demand management programs. Participants will develop a toolkit for managing traffic demand on their campuses through effective implementation of transportation demand management techniques. Instructors include: Will Toor and Spenser Havlick, coauthors of Transportation for Sustainable Campus Communities; as well the Director of Sustainable Transportation Systems at Yale and the Director of Transportation and Parking Services at University of Chicago.

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